What WPL is reading in June

June has to be one of the best months of the year. It is the start of summer vacation, we get to have the wonderful fireworks on the river, and there are so many enjoyable things to do in Windsor. For people like me, it also means that baseball season is in full swing, the Stanley Cup finals have wrapped up, and the garden needs even more attention. The 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup is also ongoing and capturing a lot of attention. Despite all that, we at WPL still find time to read. We’ve got some great books to share this month, so here is what we read:

 


 

Rob: Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan (read as an e-Audiobook.)

Dad is Fat

Dad is Fat

If you’re not familiar with Jim Gaffigan, might I suggest that you quickly acquaint yourself? The comedian has a special gift, with the ability to drop one liner after one liner to keep you laughing. A true talent, Gaffigan is able to bring out the guffaws without being offensive (unless you’re literally a baby, in which case he has made fun of your judgement.) For someone who really enjoys comedians like George Carlin, Gaffigan is a different, yet highly enjoyable, comedic beast.

This time around I enjoyed this work as an e-Audiobook downloaded from our Overdrive collection. While I’ve typically preferred having a hard copy in my hand, this book was made to listen to. I can only think that having the artists deliver the lines himself improved my enjoyment. With hilarious voices and insights into the world of family life, Dad is Fat is a thoroughly enjoyable book discussing the experiences of a man, his wife, and their five kids. It is a poignant, enjoyable, and hilarious cry for help from the comedian who has stumbled into being outnumbered by kids in his own house.

 


 

Nancy: Shovel Ready by Adam Sternberg

Shovel Ready

Shovel Ready

It is a stunning genre mash-up (noir meets sci-fi) about an anti-hero hit man in a near-future New York.  In a dystopia created by a dirty bomb in Times Square, suspense builds as the hit man, formerly a garbage man, pursues his current victim with his typical deliberate ignorance of the reasons why:  as he repeatedly states, “I’m just a bullet”.  The characters are well-drawn, and surprisingly sympathetic given the situation.  The plot gets a bit crazy, but this is a fast, enjoyable read.

 

 

 


 

Angela: Picnic in Provence: A Memoir with Recipes by Elizabeth Bard

Picnic In Provence

Picnic In Provence

Elizabeth Bard is the bestselling author of Lunch in Paris her memoir about love, food and La Ville Lumiere (The City of Light). Bard fell in love on a weekend visit to Paris, and never made it back to America. I never had a chance to read her first novel, but was intrigued by the idea so I thought I would catch up with her in the second installment of her French fairytale, Picnic in Provence. Anything to do with food, cute French boys and a beautiful European city has me interested. I started reading this memoir and quickly caught up with Bard; she is now expecting her first child with her husband Gwendal, and they are moving to the picturesque city of Cereste in the southeastern countryside of Provence. As if this isn’t a big enough transition already, the couple then decide to open up their own artisinal ice cream shop. Think honey-and-thyme and couscous-spice ice cream, and strawberry and fuchsia beet-root sorbet. I quite enjoyed Bard’s story, and was simply salivating at the accompanying recipes. How can you go wrong with sea bass with Parma ham, green olives, and champagne? Her portrayals of the French lifestyle, from the elegance of women at all ages, to the way children are raised, will have you laughing and then booking your one-way ticket across the Atlantic. This was a lovely read, and I would recommend it to anyone looking for a little cuisine, romance and humour!


Amanda: The Sixth Extinction: an Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

The Sixth Extinction

The Sixth Extinction

Kolbert’s book examines natural and human-made mass extinction events throughout our planet’s history as well as ongoing environmental concerns.  It was clear while reading this book that Kolbert has done her research, but still manages to stay away from the typical “technical” non-fiction writing style, to make it very interesting and easy to understand the underlying message.  Overall, a very-interesting and informative read.

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